What Exactly Is A Hybrid Car?

We are all concerned about the environment and doing our part to take care of it. Of all the purchases we make, the purchase that will have the greatest impact on the environment will be the car we decide to buy. Hybrid cars are an affordable and innovative way to help protect our environment and benefit from the increased fuel mileage.

Only a few years ago talk of hybrid cars had consumers stepping back unsure; but today hybrids offer a practical choice for consumers, and more and more consumers are jumping on board.

A hybrid car has a small engine that is fuel efficient, which is combined with an electric motor that aids the engine when additional power is needed during acceleration. The electric motor gets its power from battery banks which continuously charge while you are driving.

Energy is conserved when you stop because the engine is shut off automatically. Then, when you apply gas, it automatically restarts.

The hybrid car also uses a more advanced aerodynamic lightweight body, and combines it with low roll resistant tires that are stiffer and narrower to help reduce drag.

In 2004, out of the 17 million vehicles sold there were around 80,000 hybrid vehicles sold. By 2005 that number had increased by 1.2% to 200,000, and it’s estimated that by 2007 more than 400,000 hybrids will be sold.

There are several hybrids currently available in North America. They include the Honda Civic, Honda Accord, Honda Insight, Toyota Prius, and the Mercury Mariner. There are also Hybrid SUVs available – the Ford Escape, the Lexas 400H and the Toyota Highlander.

The Toyota Prius holds 52% of the hybrid market with just under 108,000 vehicles. The Honda Civic is the next most popular with 25,000 vehicles.

Now that consumer support for the hybrids has arrived, auto manufacturers are increasing the pace at which they introduce hybrid models. In 2006, the Honda CR V SUV, Saturn Vue, Hyundai Accent, and Kia Rio are being introduced as hybrid models. In 2007 we will see the Toyota Camry, Honda Fit, Mazda Tribute, Chevrolet Malibu, and Nissan Altima; and 2008 will see the Ford Fusion and Mercury Millan available as hybrids.

And as an added bonus in the United States, consumers that purchase a hybrid will get a tax break. Those purchasing fuel-cell vehicles will get up to $8000 in tax breaks, and those purchasing alternative fuel vehicles that weigh less than 8,500 pounds get a $2500 tax break. It’s a nice pleasant surprise!

If we had a crystal ball that could see into the future, there’s a good chance that what we’d see 20 years down the road would be freeways, highways, and streets that were full of hybrid vehicles. In fact, it’s likely that our gas guzzling vehicles of today are about to go the way of the dinosaur as more hybrid cars make it to market.

We are all concerned about the environment and doing our part to take care of it. Of all the purchases we make, the purchase that will have the greatest impact on the environment will be the car we decide to buy. Hybrid cars are an affordable and innovative way to help protect our environment and benefit from the increased fuel mileage.

Only a few years ago talk of hybrid cars had consumers stepping back unsure; but today hybrids offer a practical choice for consumers, and more and more consumers are jumping on board.

A hybrid car has a small engine that is fuel efficient, which is combined with an electric motor that aids the engine when additional power is needed during acceleration. The electric motor gets its power from battery banks which continuously charge while you are driving.

Energy is conserved when you stop because the engine is shut off automatically. Then, when you apply gas, it automatically restarts.

The hybrid car also uses a more advanced aerodynamic lightweight body, and combines it with low roll resistant tires that are stiffer and narrower to help reduce drag.

In 2004, out of the 17 million vehicles sold there were around 80,000 hybrid vehicles sold. By 2005 that number had increased by 1.2% to 200,000, and it’s estimated that by 2007 more than 400,000 hybrids will be sold.

There are several hybrids currently available in North America. They include the Honda Civic, Honda Accord, Honda Insight, Toyota Prius, and the Mercury Mariner. There are also Hybrid SUVs available – the Ford Escape, the Lexas 400H and the Toyota Highlander.

The Toyota Prius holds 52% of the hybrid market with just under 108,000 vehicles. The Honda Civic is the next most popular with 25,000 vehicles.

Now that consumer support for the hybrids has arrived, auto manufacturers are increasing the pace at which they introduce hybrid models. In 2006, the Honda CR V SUV, Saturn Vue, Hyundai Accent, and Kia Rio are being introduced as hybrid models. In 2007 we will see the Toyota Camry, Honda Fit, Mazda Tribute, Chevrolet Malibu, and Nissan Altima; and 2008 will see the Ford Fusion and Mercury Millan available as hybrids.

And as an added bonus in the United States, consumers that purchase a hybrid will get a tax break. Those purchasing fuel-cell vehicles will get up to $8000 in tax breaks, and those purchasing alternative fuel vehicles that weigh less than 8,500 pounds get a $2500 tax break. It’s a nice pleasant surprise!

If we had a crystal ball that could see into the future, there’s a good chance that what we’d see 20 years down the road would be freeways, highways, and streets that were full of hybrid vehicles. In fact, it’s likely that our gas guzzling vehicles of today are about to go the way of the dinosaur as more hybrid cars make it to market.